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The core question I'm looking to get an answer for is "What is a policy and how does it function?". Specifically, how does something become policy, and who is responsible for maintaining or reviewing those policies?

As a way to prompt answers to this core question, some sub-questions that might be addressed in answers are:

  • Is there any kind of official guidelines that govern policies?
  • What determines if a policy is valid or not?
  • How do votes interact with policies?
  • How are contentious policies handled?
  • Is a majority needed to implement a policy, is consensus needed, or something else?
  • Are moderators be allowed to overrule policies?
  • What happens if a user does not follow a policy?
  • Do policies get less valid with age?
  • How long do policies last for?
  • How are contradictory or conflicting policies handled?
  • Can a more specific policy overrule part of a less specific policy?
  • When are policies revisited?
  • Does revisiting a policy invalidate the original?
  • How should users determine what a policy is?
  • Do policies need to be followed all the time, or just some times?
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    \$\begingroup\$ Heavily related: What are the rules and policies of RPG.SE? \$\endgroup\$ – linksassin Nov 12 '20 at 3:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ @linksassin thanks, that one sentence "A policy is enacted by community consensus on meta, following discussions." could use a lot of fleshing out! Plus, in my limited experience, it's not accurate in the first place. Should I edit that link in to the question? If that is the starting point there's a lot of work to be done. \$\endgroup\$ – user-024673 Nov 12 '20 at 3:10
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    \$\begingroup\$ You are welcome to edit the link into the question. But you are highly unlikely to get a clearer answer than that. That is the best statement of what policies are and how they are established we have. There simply isn't a general case that can be codified for all so-called 'policies'. \$\endgroup\$ – linksassin Nov 12 '20 at 3:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ @linksassin I see, well I guess now is the time to figure out these questions! \$\endgroup\$ – user-024673 Nov 12 '20 at 3:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ While this is arguably way too broad a topic for a single post, given that it contains 15 different questions within it... The fact is that many of these things are simply not strictly defined (as indicated by @linksassin's comment above), so actually splitting this post into 15 different Q&As on meta may not be helpful either. \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Nov 12 '20 at 4:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ Another relevant Q&A: How to show the most recent community consensus in meta? \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Nov 12 '20 at 5:00
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    \$\begingroup\$ @V2Blast Rubiksmoose the core question is just "what is a policy and how does it function", the list of questions can be taken as prompts. A good answer about what a policy is would probably answer all of them without having to go into specifics. \$\endgroup\$ – user-024673 Nov 12 '20 at 6:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ @user-024673 based on that comment, I've made an edit, to try and focus the question to that core query, while retaing the "prompt" questions. If I've done so erroneously please revert back the question! \$\endgroup\$ – illustro Nov 12 '20 at 12:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ @illustro No, I think it's fine, thanks! \$\endgroup\$ – user-024673 Nov 13 '20 at 3:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ Wait, what happened to their account? Did they make a 2nd account and merge it with the old one? \$\endgroup\$ – MikeQ Nov 17 '20 at 21:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ We can't comment on moderation activity or private information and we ask people to refrain from speculation here in the comments. We can only say that the profile that was used to create this post was merged with the profile you see now which is what caused the apparent change in name. \$\endgroup\$ – Rubiksmoose Nov 17 '20 at 23:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ I have a book recommendation that I hope you'll take advantage of: How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Nov 18 '20 at 22:23
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Answering the individual questions

Note that these "answers" are informal and reflect what I have seen occur in the past with these types of situations; they do not reflect what has always happened or will always happen, only what I would call the "typical" results:

Is there any kind of official guidelines that govern policies?

Aside from the following Q&A I am not aware of any rigid (or loose) guidelines regarding policies; only what generally happens to happen:

What determines if a policy is valid or not?

I'm not entirely sure what you mean when you use the word "valid"; just about anything can be a policy if it has (Meta) community consensus.

How do votes interact with policies?

Often, policies stem from questions about policies. That is, a question will ask how/whether something should be done and answers will give differing, well, answers to that question. The highest-scoring answer is likely to be considered the "policy" answer, as it is the one with the most (Meta) community consensus.

How are contentious policies handled?

Policies can be revisited after they are made (I at least believe that they should be as otherwise it would be tradition for tradition's sake and current policies wouldn't reflect the current state of the site). That said, how often policies can be revisited is not something I have seen answered anywhere.

Note that contending with a policy does not change the fact that it is the policy and that it must be followed.

Is a majority needed to implement a policy, is consensus needed, or something else?

The highest-scoring answer to a question about a policy is the one that is the most agreed upon by the (Meta) community (or at least something similar to being the most agreed upon answer). Thus this is the answer that is, for lack of a better word, "promoted" into being a policy.

Are moderators be allowed to overrule policies?

Well, I'm not a moderator, but moderators are site users just like everybody else and they (as far as I'm aware) cannot assume any sort of dictatorial or "because I said so" sort of stance. They must follow policies just like regular site members.

What happens if a user does not follow a policy?

Ideally, they would have the current policy explained to them and would learn from it moving forward by following the policy in the future. Whatever policy-defying action they took would almost certainly be undone but I certainly don't believe people should expect users (especially new users) to know the various policies of RPG.SE which are buried across numerous posts on an almost completely separate site.

Do policies get less valid with age?

I don't believe they get "less valid" but they certainly get less reliable in the sense that they reflect less the current state of the site. If a policy stood for 50 years one would certainly hope that the reasons the policy was ever implemented were still around and if they weren't still around, one would certainly hope that the policy be revisited as the times had changed.

How long do policies last for?

There is not set time that I am aware of. Policies are changed by being revisited, so without a revisit I suppose they would last indefinitely (unless of course the policy came with an expiration date, which I have never seen happen).

How are contradictory or conflicting policies handled?

These should not ever exist. If two policies contradict one another this is a fundamental problem that should be pointed out and addressed quickly enough that the contradiction has little to no effect on the sites.

Can a more specific policy overrule part of a less specific policy?

Without a specific example this is probably unanswerable. However, as far as I'm aware, policies can do whatever they want (while avoiding contradictions); after all, it's just an agreed upon set of rules.

When are policies revisited?

I don't know. There is probably an entire separate Meta discussion buried in here that I don't want to hash out.

Does revisiting a policy invalidate the original?

The answers and votes and comments and time that users spent on the original question are still noteworthy, valuable, and available; so it isn't invalidated in that sense. However, yes, the entire point of revisiting a policy is to either change or maintain the then-current policy (you could call this "invalidating" it).

How should users determine what a policy is?

Generally if a question is asking about how something should be done or whether something should be done; the highest-scoring answer is going to be the current policy. That doesn't mean every Meta Q&A is about policies (we probably have very very few actually policies at all), and it is only the case generally. Recently, the moderators have gone and added little sections of text to the end of some policy questions describing what the current policy actually is in case it would/could otherwise be unclear.

Do policies need to be followed all the time, or just some times?

The entire point of a policy is that it is always followed by everybody. However, context, context, context: It matters and shapes our ideas around things because we know a policy can't be perfect and account for every possible future event, I mean, we can't even accurately imagine every possible future event so we have no chance of accounting for them all anyway. We just do our best here and we know situations and events can occur where a "policy" gets... complicated.


I at least do not want a rigidly-defined process

To me, having a rigidly defined method of creating and establishing policies (such as through implementing a set time after which the highest-scoring answer is promoted into a policy) gives easy ways to track down errors, loopholes, and ways to abuse or cheat the system.

A quote that summaries much of how I feel about the "policies" here:

[...] I wish the word "policy" weren't getting slung around so much. Like it or not, we don't really have policies nearly as much as we have practices. There are very few things around here that anyone--editor, voter, moderator, employee--is going to say is so clear that "yes, this will be applied in all situations, no consideration given, no context needed."

We aren't a legal system, we aren't a rigidly defined system of checks and balances. We're people trying their best, and we know that a rule can always have an exception. You simply cannot see the future.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh thanks! This is a lot of great info! I'll make some comments are a read along :) I say "valid" meaning "in use", for example an old superseded policy isn't "valid". You say "consensus" but do you just mean "has the most votes"? Maybe it's a dialect thing, but I take consensus to mean basically unanimous, not "51%" kind of thing. Maybe the 5e policy isn't a great example, as it seems to be kind of a hostile policy in the first place (eg saying that D&D expects "guess" systems, implying D&D players are stupid, etc), so I guess it's a special case and that's why the contradiction happened? \$\endgroup\$ – user-024673 Nov 12 '20 at 6:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's good that moderators have started doing that, it would definitely help clear up the problem of policy threads being useless to new users. You say the entire point of policies are that they are always followed by everyone, a couple of users have told me they do not think that is the case which I find very interesting. I don't believe these are troublemakers or clueless users too. Again, thanks for all the great info, this is super valuable for new users!! \$\endgroup\$ – user-024673 Nov 12 '20 at 6:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user-024673 What I've seen is that the highest-scoring answer (after some unpredictable but often at least one month) amount of time is considered to be the most suitable as a policy. Of course, other metrics could be used and other methods but that gets into a debate that's been held countless times throughout the history of the world. There's no percent requirement, just having the highest score (score = #upvotes - #downvotes). \$\endgroup\$ – Medix2 Nov 12 '20 at 13:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ Again, the "never guess the system policy" is rather poorly named as it used the term "guess" when it really means "editing in a system tag when the OP has not perfectly, entirely, and explicitly stated the system (and edition, if applicable) that they are playing. Furthermore, the "Is 5e a clear statement of system" question is truly an exceptional event in that the highest-scoring answer changed after a policy had been established. The moderators leaving little policy declarations on the questions will likely prevent any similar confusion in the future. \$\endgroup\$ – Medix2 Nov 12 '20 at 13:39
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    \$\begingroup\$ Regarding your statement about policies not needing to be followed; I would assume that either you misinterpreted something somebody said, what was being talked about was not actually a policy but only a guideline, or (and I do believe this to be highly unlikely) somebody actually violated a policy here. If they actually did, I would imagine (and hope) that their action was undone \$\endgroup\$ – Medix2 Nov 12 '20 at 13:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user-024673 Are you able to link to the cases of users saying policies don't need to be followed by everyone (assuming I understood you correctly). I would very much like the full context for those statements, because it sounds like there may be an misunderstanding somewhere (which would best be clarified, else the sprouting discussions may be more harmful than fruitful). \$\endgroup\$ – Someone_Evil Nov 12 '20 at 19:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Medix2 Agreed that the policy is a bit degrading, definitely not ideal to word it in such a hostile and confusing way. Regarding people saying policies don't have to be followed here are a few links for you and Someone_Evil: chat.stackexchange.com/transcript/message/54436995#54436995 chat.stackexchange.com/transcript/message/56130217#56130217 \$\endgroup\$ – user-024673 Nov 13 '20 at 3:14
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user-024673 None of those actually say people don't have to follow policy. They talk about wishing that 'policy' wasn't the term. There is a difference there. \$\endgroup\$ – NautArch Nov 13 '20 at 13:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ @NautArch I believe you did not finish reading the quotes I linked. The first very clearly and explicitly says that policies do not have to be followed all the time. The second says that pragmatically policies are more like conversations than laws. Please check again. \$\endgroup\$ – user-024673 Nov 16 '20 at 1:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ You need to stop reading what you want in statements others make. You could interpret that as what was said, but it is not actually explicitly and clearly saying that. Your approach is tainted by your assumptions. \$\endgroup\$ – NautArch Nov 16 '20 at 19:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ @NautArch I am not sure how to interpret "There are very few things around here that anyone--editor, voter, moderator, employee--is going to say is so clear that "yes, this will be applied in all situations, no consideration given, no context needed."" in any way other than "policies do not have to be followed 100% of the time", it actually seems to me to imply that most people believe policies are not absolute. Apologies if my interpretation is not correct :/ \$\endgroup\$ – user-024673 Nov 17 '20 at 1:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ Just stop interpreting. If you want clarification, please ask. But you need to stop trying to guess what other people mean. \$\endgroup\$ – NautArch Nov 17 '20 at 12:53
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user-024673 More guidelines than rules; and if you haven't seen the movie Pirates of the Caribbean (the first one) I'd recommend it for two reasons: first of all, it's a fun, swashbuckling movie and secondly they make frequent references to guidelines rather than rules which I think is useful for this conversation. FWIW, those two chat entries you cited are well expressed points by experienced users that don't seem to mean what you think that they mean. (No, my name is not Inigo Montoya, so you are safe 😎 ) \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Nov 17 '20 at 13:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ @NautArch Would you mind explaining then? \$\endgroup\$ – user-024673 Nov 18 '20 at 1:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user-024673 for informal groups, norms are at least as important as policies. I don't see this stack as a formal group, so I am more interested in norms than in policy, which carries with it a heavy-handed connotation \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Nov 18 '20 at 12:00
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There is no agreement on many of these topics

The thing that has struck me is that there is very little agreement on fundamental things like "what is a policy", "what determines if a policy is valid", or "how does revisiting a policy work". I have received many different opinions, very close to 1 per person.

I suspect that even of "meta" had 100% agreement (which it is nowhere near close to) that still leaves the vast majority of users that policies affect in anarchy. I think this is a substantial issue since policies affect these users.

I'm just writing here the answers I gather from other people as I go; I know there isn't much established knowledge on this topic, so everything is a bit random. I have heard many conflicting opinions on how things run, I'm noting them down here as that indicates further discussion is needed. Medix's post is great but it's still just 1 person's opinion - I have added their points to this post too.

Is there any kind of official guidelines that govern policies?

No, and the idea of "policy" isn't exactly agreed upon either - some users have suggested alternate times for the concept to reduce confusion, eg "practice".

What determines if a policy is valid or not?

Policies are valid so long as another policy hasn't invalidated them and they previously achieved "consensus" - I have heard several opinions as to what "consensus" means, I'll discuss them in the next point.

Old policies are still valid, they just may have lost a bit of their context. Whether or not these hap-hazardous policies need to be followed is a point of debate in the community.

How do votes interact with policies?

A question is posted, and people post their suggested policies as answers; after a voting period, the highest-voted answer is "the policy". There is no set "voting period", so it's on a case-by-case basis. After that, voting may change, so the highest-voted answer may not be the actual policy, as it may have been voted up after that voting period ended.

Generally it is held that the top answer is valid if it has some amount of margin, but that margin is hotly debated. Here are some opinions I have heard:

  1. Simple majority is enough, even if it's only by 1 vote.
  2. A substantial majority, 1 vote isn't enough, but a good lead of 5 or 10 votes is plenty (note that most policies only get around 20 votes at most, so this is a 25-50% lead).
  3. Unanimity, most of the meta community need to be in agreement, alternate answers should have far fewer votes (although no guidelines as to what this means exactly, it should be >50%).

Keep in mind that often people suggest very similar policies, so the top 3 answers may have similar levels of votes, even the same number of votes. However if these are all basically the same policy, then that is good enough. In this case first answer is usually picked as the policy.

However, this is not universally agreed on. Some users say that the top post is "the policy" regardless of the "voting period" - the history doesn't matter, only the current top answer does.

How are contentious policies handled?

Newer policies overrule older policies, even if the older policy was more specific. If people disagree with the policy, they can post a thread to revisit it.

Are moderators be allowed to overrule policies?

No. Sometimes it may appear that a moderator is overruling a policy because they are stating the opposite of the top post(s); but they are actually just restating the policy as it was at the end of the voting period. Mods aren't supposed to overrule policies.

What happens if a user does not follow a policy?

It seems like this issue is not well known, there are a lot of different opinions as to what happens.

  1. Nothing directly, but other users may downvote/vote to delete a user's posts if they are not following the policy. This can lead to the system automatically banning the user for a short time (called a suspension).

  2. An alternate theory is that the system won't ban you; it will just stop you from asking questions, and this only happens if your questions are getting downvoted - there's no penalty for not following policies with regard to answers.

  3. Some users have said that this is not correct, moderators can and do ban users directly for not following policies.

Additionally, Moderators can also enforce their stance on policies by deleting comments/answers and applying greater penalties as they see fit - there aren't guides on this; it is up to the moderator's judgement.

Do policies get less valid with age?

No, but they can be overruled, and since the votes on the answers can change that means the policy can look like it's saying the opposite of what it really says. They also become less reliable in that the site may have changed significantly since the policy's inception. If you follow the school of thought of "policies should be applied only if it makes sense in context", then older policies probably apply less often.

This thinking doesn't exist in the "everyone must always follow policies" model.

How are contradictory or conflicting policies handled?

The newer policy is the right one. When conflicting policies exist this can lead to one or both policies being revisited.

One point to be clear about is that if a policy is revisited and the thread is either inconclusive or to retain the policy, that invalidates all policies that may otherwise have overruled it.

For example in 2015 policy A is made. Then in 2016 policy B is made which overrules A. In 2017 there is a thread to revisit policy A. If this re-visitation is inconclusive or to reaffirm policy A, then that would overrule policy B.

Some users interpret inconclusive votes to mean that the policy is abolished.

Can a more specific policy overrule part of a less specific policy?

Newer policies overrule older ones. Specific or general doesn't matter.

When are policies revisited?

Any user can start a re-visitation of a policy.

Does revisiting a policy invalidate the original?

There are two schools of thought:

  1. Revisiting the policy invalidates the later regardless of the outcome
  2. Revisiting the policy only invalidates the later if the outcome is to overthrow it

Revisiting policies can lead to either reaffiriming the previous policy, introducing a new policy, abolishing the policy, or a moderators could deem it "too contentious" - this is at moderator discretion; as far as I know, there are no guidelines like "it needs 20% more votes to pass", etc.

How should users determine what a policy is?

There is no way for users to do this besides asking around and seeing what people say. However, recently some policies have been moved to Q&A posts, which overrule all policy discussion threads and correctly list the policy. Checking Q&A seems to be, at this time, the only reliable way to determine what a policy is.

Do policies need to be followed all the time, or just some times?

There seem to be 2 schools of thought on this:

  1. Policies should be followed in all situations, no consideration given, no context needed.
  2. Always follow policies all the time - but keep in mind the context is important; policies are not perfect and cannot predict every situation.
  3. Policies are more like practices. How the policy fits the situation is more important than dogmatically following the policy.

From a pragmatic point of view, the downside of not following a policy is the downvotes and potential deletion. It is not unheard of for even a popular and high rep user to be banned due to this (although it is unclear if it was automatic or by mods).

This site only considers fraudulent votes to be serial upvoting/downvoting, so voting based on policy is ok here.

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    \$\begingroup\$ This answer makes assumptions and oversimplifications that are largely incorrect, hence the downvotes. However there are a few remarks regarding the role of moderators I would like to clarify to prevent misinformation. General guidelines for moderators can be found in the help centre. Moderators are just regular users whose posts and opinions can be voted on just like anyone else. We do not override policies at whim, or dictate when they should be revisited. We simply enforce policy to the best of our ability based on meta discussions. \$\endgroup\$ – linksassin Nov 12 '20 at 13:44
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    \$\begingroup\$ In short, any place that your post differs from Medix2's is likely incorrect. Particularly any remark you make about moderators or bans. I have done nothing but try to help explain the situation to you and find a solution to issues you highlighted. I find you characterizing my (or other mods) actions as "dictating" offensive, please desist from this line of comments. I personally have reached out to try to explain things to you but you declined. \$\endgroup\$ – linksassin Nov 13 '20 at 4:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ I did not override a policy, but clarified what the established policy was and that the vote had made the meta misleading. The recent 'revisit' was posted by a mod yes, but others have been posted by non-mods. Nothing prevents other users from posted a revisit, they are simply more likely to be posted by a mod as we try to keep an eye on what policies might be causing problems on the site and suggest revisits to improve those policies for all users. \$\endgroup\$ – linksassin Nov 13 '20 at 4:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ So this answer is mostly technically correct. There's a mischaracterization about how mods work, because this is from the perspective of a new user. To explain: Moderators are still site users, so they are expected to follow policies regardless of personal stance. A rogue moderator could enforce their own opinions over the site consensus, but doing so would be a misuse of mod powers and would have consequences. \$\endgroup\$ – MikeQ Nov 13 '20 at 8:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ The claim "if you are a high rep popular user, you don't have to follow them" is wrong. High-reputation users are still subject to the same rules as everyone else, and their bad answers can still be downvoted and deleted. Regardless of reputation, a user's repeated violations or harassment can still get them suspended or banned. Reputation measures a user's participation over time, but is otherwise meaningless, and doesn't give a user permission to ignore the rules. \$\endgroup\$ – MikeQ Nov 13 '20 at 8:34
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    \$\begingroup\$ People can upvote or downvote whoever they want. I like many folks here and I downvote their bad answers regularly. Other than the 20 rep needed to participate in the mainsite chat, rep is meaningless. \$\endgroup\$ – MikeQ Nov 13 '20 at 8:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ This high rep popular user - me - got suspended for 30 days a couple of years ago. Just to let you know that you've missed the mark at least once in your answer. As to this - but from a pragmatic point of view, people aren't going to downvote their friends is demonstrably false. One of my long time friends here, (NautArch), down votes me with some frequency when he feels I've put out low quality stuff. (As well he should, eh?) He usually leaves a comment (it helps that we trust each other). Sometimes I respond, and maybe the DV goes away if he finds the correction sound; sometimes not. \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Nov 16 '20 at 18:27
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    \$\begingroup\$ You should at least consider that there is a direct correlation between reputation and quality of content. New users are statistically more likely to provide lower quality content due to lack of experience and familiarity with expectations. Poor content being filtered out is the system working as intended, and that low rep users provide more low quality content than high rep user shouldn’t be surprising. \$\endgroup\$ – Thomas Markov Nov 17 '20 at 0:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user-024673 The general aim of SE and SO sites is "High signal to noise ratio" - which a great many users fail to grasp as they participate. True for users, new, medium, and old. \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Nov 17 '20 at 0:55
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user-024673 If you take my remarks as "justification" they I can't help you. I am trying to tell you what is, not some fantasy world of "I wish it were like this" \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Nov 17 '20 at 1:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ For a somewhat different perspective, I spent three months doing nothing but reading the stack and learning how things worked and how to write good content. I wrote my first answer on June 4th of this year and have been the top user every month since. I am the #1 user in rep per day on the stack, and it’s because I took some time to learn what good content was and how the stack worked. I listened and learned before I began to post. I have had no trouble with the mods or anyone else because I assumed from the beginning that this is a meritocracy and the quality of my content is what matters. \$\endgroup\$ – Thomas Markov Nov 17 '20 at 1:27
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user-024673 Sorry, you have offended me, and "I am trying to clarify what you are saying" is "I am reframing what you said in my words" - doing that offends me. Don't pull that nonsense with me. Now, please, stop treating this comment stream as a chat and go and do your due diligience: search my user name and the term new user. You obviously have not done that. So, Do Your Homework. \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Nov 17 '20 at 1:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user-024673 Neither. We each (heck, we all) approach a given environment from our own point of view. As with other things in life, what you get out of it depends on what you put into it. And I note that, once again, you have not done as I asked. That sends a message. \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Nov 17 '20 at 1:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ The only requirement is a willingness to learn. \$\endgroup\$ – Thomas Markov Nov 17 '20 at 2:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ I think it would be helpful to go back to the basic Stack Overload model, and the core Stack Exchange model. The original design intent was expert answers to well researched questions. (Mouse over the down vote button for more on that). RPGSE is a sub set / spin off of the larger body of Stack Exchange sites. It isn't Reddit. It isn't a discussion forum. It isn't Twitter. It isn't quora. @Thomas Markov's point on "willingness to learn" is absolutely spot on. I have written technical manuals and monographs, but I still had to learn a new writing style for this format. So, I did. \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Nov 17 '20 at 13:40

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