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I just had the experience of looking for the "How do I ask a good question?" help page and struggling to find it. The very first thing I did to try to find it was type the page's exact title into the rpg.meta.stackexchange search bar and found... no questions that clearly asked this. I'm sure this admission makes me look like quite the newbie to anyone who has been on this site for a long time, but for people who haven't spent much time here (i.e., the people most likely to need to find the page), some/many of them will have failed to notice or remember where it is. I think I took a pretty intuitive route to finding the page, and a question with the page's exact title whose answer is the relevant link would be helpful to anyone taking this same route.

Should I (or someone) ask a question with this page's title and answer it with the appropriate link in order to help others find it? Is there a reason these kinds of questions are kept from the site?

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We already have this, kind of.

The help center is linked at the very top of our site’s FAQ Index.

Additionally, we also have this Q&A:

This seems to be what you’re looking for. If not, there’s nothing wrong with asking your question here. We’ve handled similar questions about navigating the site before. It’s one of the things meta is for.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, I get that there is an obvious place to look for it, but I don't think this answers my question. I'm saying that I had a real user experience in which I didn't know about the FAQ Index yet, and I went to many places including Google before finding the page I was looking for. One of the places I looked (and that others will likely look) is a place that we can easily put a bread-crumb in via a question. Isn't it worth helping out a future user who's trying to find it by doing that? Or is there a reason not to? \$\endgroup\$
    – nben
    May 7, 2022 at 3:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ If I'm literally the only person in the world who has had trouble finding the help page, I'll accept that as an answer to this question, but I guess I'm skeptical. Alternately, if there's a policy against this (or against duplicating information or something like that), I'd accept that and it's reasoning as well. \$\endgroup\$
    – nben
    May 7, 2022 at 3:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ @nben That you already knew about meta is a bit of an anomaly among new users, I think. Most users are going to be aware of the tour and help center well before having the knowledge required to even think to search on meta. \$\endgroup\$ May 7, 2022 at 3:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ I've been using the stack exchange sites for years (mostly in programming/math spaces); I think it is easy to overestimate how familiar users are with these kinds of documents, which I guess is kind of my point. I am familiar with meta from other sites, but not with this site's documentation. \$\endgroup\$
    – nben
    May 7, 2022 at 3:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ Let us continue this discussion in chat. \$\endgroup\$ May 7, 2022 at 3:33
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We Already Encourage This, Exactly

From, Can I Answer My Own Question?

Yes! Stack Exchange has always explicitly encouraged users to answer their own questions. If you have a question that you already know the answer to, and you would like to document that knowledge in public so that others (including yourself) can find it later, it's perfectly okay to ask and answer your own question on a Stack Exchange site.

It's a little-- no pun intended-- meta, but I see no reason this would be disallowed. But like all questions and answers, both will run the risk of being downvoted.

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