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With the wealth of RPG systems and questions that can be given more flavor from answering a non rules lawyering question....Is it alright or just frowned upon to answer from a similar systems perspective to give more options?

Case in point: Ive played 4e in the past. Ive read books cover to cover in 3.5. Ive played Pathfinder, 13th age, and Dungeon World on a frequent basis. All these systems have obvious differences but some things that are broad enough or insightful enough that could be used by Rule 0 of DMing seem to garner so much dislike from 4e or 3.5e more often than not.

Should I just ultimately ignore those tags and not answer questions within since they seem much more close minded and prone to immediately downvoting things? Is this a common thing for those two in particular?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Downvoting shouldn't be used to tell the community you dislike the content of an answer, it should be used to mark answers that are bad, not solving the problem that was asked, or downright wrong (like some undoubtably wrong take on a rules-as-written question. Is this kind of downvotes you're worried about? Can you point us at some examples of the problem, to help us understand where it lies? Maybe it's just me not being a native English speaker, but your middle paragraph seems quite vague to me. \$\endgroup\$ – Zachiel Feb 21 '14 at 16:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ The downvoting seems to be used to dislike more than to get rid of wrong answers in those tags (or perhaps I caught people on a bad day). I try to avoid any questions that are looking directly for rules as written responses unless I can quantify it as "Hey this worked for me in this situation, perhaps you can do similar". \$\endgroup\$ – TechImp Feb 21 '14 at 16:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ Middle paragraph was just stating Ive played a bunch of different systems and there are common threads that can be used to help streamline or find solutions in other systems, which can be allowed under Rule 0: GM can alter as they see fit. \$\endgroup\$ – TechImp Feb 21 '14 at 16:40
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user3303373 If they tag or say as Rules as Written, that's probably what they want. If that's not explicit, then it depends how far afield you are. \$\endgroup\$ – C. Ross Feb 21 '14 at 17:30
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Is it alright or just frowned upon to answer from a similar systems perspective to give more options?

If the answer is applicable, yes. Answering a 4e question with something from Pathfinder often isn't applicable as the systems are not really related. Answering a Pathfinder thing with a 3.5 thing might be, but it's better to find the Pathfinder rule itself whenever possible.

The difficulty with this is that while there's similarities, there's also differences. You can trip someone up by giving an answer that seems entirely correct unless you have enough system knowledge to realize it's one of the things they changed.

Now, if the question is more about "how should a DM handle weird situation X?" or other things that aren't as rule based, your experience in similar systems is more relevant. Things like coming up with character backstory, interesting NPCs, plotlines, etc, all have universal issues across these systems and your experience applies.

Rule 0 of DMing seem to garner so much dislike from 4e or 3.5e

I suspect this is where your trouble really is. Rule 0 is a useful tool, but it's very easy to use it like a hammer and treat every problem as a nail. There are lots of situations where there is a better answer than to use Rule 0, and the community has been known to respond to people throwing rule 0 as the answer to problems that have another solution with downvotes.

If you were going to answer with rule 0, it'd be a good idea to provide some other alternatives first, and say "if none of those will work for you, then you can use rule 0." In my experience, that type of answer tends to garner a more positive response.

I try to avoid any questions that are looking directly for rules as written responses unless I can quantify it as...

This was from one of your comments. Rules As Written questions are explicitly looking for the literal written rule. If you're trying to quantify it as anything else, you're misunderstanding what is being asked. The best answers to a RAW question will quote specific rules or errata as evidence, and will not say something like "we houseruled this to solve the problem."

RAW questions are only interested in what the rules say.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Plus, I'll note 4e is pretty rules-legal in tone in general - for 3.5 it's more our own set of hardcore 3.5 aficionados here on the site that have... strong opinions about how the game rules should be treated. \$\endgroup\$ – mxyzplk Feb 21 '14 at 18:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ @mxyzplk D&D3.x doesn't always have clear rules-legalese, but it's definitely full of rules-legalese as well. Of course, it doesn't help that a lot of people are using SRD-style sources (since they're so much easier to search and quote), which tend to emphasize that part of the game text. \$\endgroup\$ – Alex P Feb 21 '14 at 18:43

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