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I have come across a bit of a stressful situation in-game, and I want to know if anyone might be able to give some suggestions as to what I might be able to do.

Trouble is, from that explanation, a lot of people are immediately going to say "No, too broad." But what if I have the situation figured out to a "Go left or go right?" situation?

EDIT: To clarify, this question is asking "Is it ok to ask for advice for a specific, in-game situation".

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    \$\begingroup\$ It's not an auspicious start that I have no idea what you're asking here. \$\endgroup\$
    – mxyzplk
    Sep 16, 2014 at 0:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well, to explain as best I can, It's a hostage situation, and it's basically a question of "I have two options, What should I do?" I.e. Shoot or put down my guns? I don't really want to elaborate for space reasons. It's a Very specific situation. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ben
    Sep 16, 2014 at 0:50
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    \$\begingroup\$ Sometimes it happens that a question is fine, but not a good fit here. This sounds like one of those. In those cases, do make use of the other resources on the Internet, like chat rooms and RPG forums. We won't mind, we're not jealous. :) \$\endgroup\$ Sep 16, 2014 at 1:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm voting to close this as unclear because I have no idea what kind of question you're asking about. We have lots of questions of various varieties of "what should I do in this situation", some of which are good, some of which are bad. Being specific is also not a problem. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 16, 2014 at 6:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ @doppelgreener as per the edit, have I made it any clearer? \$\endgroup\$
    – Ben
    Sep 16, 2014 at 6:50
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    \$\begingroup\$ ...well, sort of? That edit describes about a thousand questions on here, which of course are ok, I'm not sure what the problem is. You might be better off just telling us what the problem is in brief and asking us if it's the kind of question we handle, rather than giving us various extremely vague high-level descriptions of it. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 16, 2014 at 6:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ Adding the relevant bits of the chat transcript might make this clearer. The only reason I gave an answer was because I watched the question form. \$\endgroup\$
    – Miniman
    Sep 16, 2014 at 6:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Miniman could you please do that? I'm not too sure how to do that, but I can look at the edit and remember for next time :) \$\endgroup\$
    – Ben
    Sep 16, 2014 at 7:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ @doppelgreener Urk. I could, but I'm worried about the length of it. The situation has some backstory that needs to be explained to understand the situation. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ben
    Sep 16, 2014 at 7:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ Chat transcript would help, since it sounds like that would help you not repeat yourself. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 16, 2014 at 7:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ I can't edit in meta (not sure why), but the relevant bits of chat start here. \$\endgroup\$
    – Miniman
    Sep 16, 2014 at 23:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Miniman users under 2k rep can't edit others' posts in meta unless they are CW. (obviously this is no longer a concern for you) \$\endgroup\$
    – wax eagle
    Nov 6, 2014 at 15:48

2 Answers 2

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You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face. Chatty, open-ended questions diminish the usefulness of our site and push other questions off the front page. (Help Center, "Don't Ask")

The fundamental issue with this style of question is the second clause, "answerable" these questions aren't answerable because it's nigh impossible to provide all of the information required to answer the question.

If the question provides a huge amount of detail, we might be able to answer it, but it's going to be hard to judge which answer is best in an objective sense. And there is a fundamental reason why. Let's suppose that you ask a question, and provide two possible solutions. You receive two answers, the first comes down on option B, and the second comes down on option A. You go back to your game the next week and decide you like option A the best. That works out OK. How do you know option A was better than option B? There's generally no way to traverse back to the decision point and travel down option A a ways.

There are circumstances where we can explain the reasoning behind a decision in sufficient detail that you will always be led to the right decision, but generally, I find in game decisions aren't something that you want to ask about here from the POV of a player. As a DM it's a good idea as that will often lead you to be better play, but as a player in a game, too much is usually out of your hands for some random folks on the internets to provide you with good advice.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ As @Miniman suggested, which I agree with, the question I am thinking of is far too specific to my case, in a specific circumstance, with only two options. No one else is going to benefit from this question, apart from me. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ben
    Sep 16, 2014 at 1:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Ben This answer is far superior to mine. It expands on the subjectivity which was the main point of my answer, and making questions relevant to others is actually only a 'good question' guide line rather than a 'bad question' rule. \$\endgroup\$
    – Miniman
    Sep 16, 2014 at 1:25
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This type of question can't have an objectively best answer, because the consequences of your decision depend entirely on your DM.

As well as being subjective, it's also entirely specific to you.

The only way I can see a question of this type being answerable is if it was something along the likes of: "In this specific system, with this specific character, will attacking with my spear or my axe do more damage?"

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