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I asked a question about how to hide something from PCs. It got closed as too broad, which I can kinda see, but I got an answer before it was suspended that gave me exactly the information I was looking for.

What am I supposed to do now? Editing it to make it less broad might invalidate the answer I got that I liked, and from my perspective, I'm all set. My use-case is pretty specific and I'm not sure the question would be of much help to others.

I don't want to delete since I like that answer and would like to let them keep the rep boost as thanks, but keeping the question up as "on hold" seems to be the wrong move.

Is there a procedure for this?

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    \$\begingroup\$ One thing you have to understand in Stack is that votes are cast against the content, not against the creator. There is no demerit in having one closed question. Keep asking, keep engaging. \$\endgroup\$ – Mindwin Jun 26 '17 at 22:12
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You can just leave it as-is. If you have more specific questions to ask, you can follow those up via posting new questions.

I don't want to delete since I like that answer and would like to let them keep the rep boost as thanks, but keeping the question up as "on hold" seems to be the wrong move.

It's actually OK to leave it on hold if you're not sure what you'd do with it to make it appropriate for the site. You won't get in trouble. We'll keep the question around as well.

It might seem odd from an initial sniff test because this superficially resembles a pattern we don't like: person drives by with low quality question, gets answer, question's closed, that person leaves with a “ha-haaa, suckers, i got all i need, peace out losers.” 🕺 However we don't like that pattern specifically because it's parasitic and the user's acting in bad faith.

You're engaging with us in good faith, and actively working to do the best you can for the site and community, and that's admirable. Categorically this is not one of those bad situations. You're just not really sure what to do with the question.

All's OK here, you can leave it be.

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    \$\begingroup\$ That's good to know! I'm always worried that I'm accidentally breaking some code I don't know about; thank you for explaining \$\endgroup\$ – Alex Jun 21 '17 at 14:09
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    \$\begingroup\$ No problem. :) Thanks for checking in about it. \$\endgroup\$ – doppelgreener Jun 21 '17 at 14:10

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