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I have established a room for exploring the possibility of writing a Journal paper of around 5k words for the international Journal of Role-Playing. This is an unranked journal full of grad-student submissions, but it has potential.

The paper will probably be looking at different perceptions of the hobby using answers to popular and controversial questions as a case-study. I'm aiming my sights low so that we can establish the academic suitability of using the content of this site for case studies. Once we've established that it's valid, we can perform more interesting and articulate studies and experiments.

I would like 2-3 co-authors. The paper is due 1st August. We'll be doing most of the writing on google docs.

Link to Issue 2 and CFP

For whomever can make it, we're discussing the issue in chat today.

Who's in?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you link to the journal, I'm interested in looking at it to see what I'd be getting into. \$\endgroup\$ – C. Ross Jun 2 '11 at 12:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ My other paper: Constrained Optimization in Dungeons and Dragons: A Theory of Requirements Generation for Effective Character Creation By me, and Samuel Russell bit.ly/ConstrainedOptRPG \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Ballsun-Stanton Sep 14 '11 at 8:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ Closed because it's done! Not deleting because the paper is linked below. \$\endgroup\$ – mxyzplk - Justice for Monica Jan 4 '12 at 0:03
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I'm in; I enjoy the more on point scholarly articles in the IJRP.

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Clerics, Magic Users, Fighters, and Thieves: Theoretical Approaches to Rules Questions on the Role-Playing Games Stack Exchange. By me, @mxyzplk and @cross

http://bit.ly/RpgSeCaseStudy

Popular Abstract:

There are many different ways of thinking about the rules of a role-playing game. Some people want to use the “rules as written.” Others argue for the “rules as intended.” Still others think that the “rule of cool” trumps both of them. We present a description of how people on the Role-Playing Games Stack Exchange answer questions about RPGs. We borrow the four classes from the most popular iteration of early Dungeons & Dragons to lend memorable labels to these ways of thinking.

A cleric, or Jurist, likes the rules as written. The cleric prefers to get rules from external books and believes that the rules trump reality. The rules as written make for a fair, fun, and predictable game. If the rules aren’t working, they try to find a better game.

A magic user, or Innovator, likes to make house rules and improve on the rules. The magic user will make new rules to fit particular situations within their game, acting as god, game master, and game designer for their players.

A fighter, or Realist, likes the rules as intended, and that intent is to simulate the world of the game. The fighter knows that the game mimics reality. When the rules present silly results, reality wins, and real-world history, tactics, and equipment are as valid an argument as anything in the rulebook.

A thief, or Imaginative, likes the rule of cool. The thief knows games are for entertainment. If something isn’t fun, it shouldn’t be in the game. If something is awesome, it will be in their game (even if they have to ignore the rules and any sense of reality to have it).

This case study looks at how people answered questions that cut across these concerns - about how to make players not focus on the rules, how to make players not be “a bunch of murderous cretins,” and the natural spread of adventurers hiking in the woods in the D&D Fourth Edition game. We have selected answers from all four classes in order to show how each class answers the same question in a distinctly different way.

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I'd be happy to help with some of the legwork, but I'm not sure you actually want me writing.

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Sorry I missed the chat - I've been away the last few days. If you still need co-authors, I'd be glad to join.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Feel free to drop in and brainstorm :) \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Ballsun-Stanton Jun 6 '11 at 9:32

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