28

Yes. Encouraging users to wait 24 hours before accepting an answer is good. The Problems For Answerers I am not primarily concerned about the effect on answerers, though I think those exist (fastest gun syndrome, discouraging answers after the accept). The Problems For Askers This is about teaching users - especially new users, who are pretty much the ...


26

For now, neither It is completely okay not to accept any answer if you feel the issue is not clear. You are under no obligation to reward the highest voted answer either. The two systems have different purposes. Try them "Accept" is also there to indicate what has actually worked for the querent. If you try the answers out and see that one solves your ...


24

Flag as “other” and explain the issue in the custom flag area. Moderators have the ability to delete answers even when they've been accepted, and unless there's a good reason not to, such flags are generally acted on. Before I got my diamond I ran into this at least once and used a custom flag to request my accepted answer be deleted, and that took care of ...


20

Unfortunately for the hapless souls who offer that "yeah this works" answer when it's wrong, the usual resolution communities use is to downvote that accepted (but wrong) answer more heavily than it would usually see until it's very, very obviously wrong and that readers should keep scrolling, and because it's accepted they can't delete it. Other answers get ...


20

This sounds like an ideal case for accepting your own answer. Go ahead. To answer your questions: Is there a way to pass the right to accept answers to another user or a group of users? There is not. You retain sole agency over the accepted answer. Not even diamond moderators can change or set an accepted answer on your behalf. Generally speaking, is ...


17

Wait until you use the advice, and then use the checkmark to indicate which one helped you most. There's no time limit on accepting an answer, so there's no need to rush when the nature of the question requires using the answers before you can know which is best. (If you find that what works best after all isn't any one answer, but a combination of them or ...


16

Yes, you should. That is the nature of the site, finding what works for the asker.


16

Usually the accepted answer is to mark “this fixed my problem”. So, try your favourites out in practice, see what you find, and if any one answer is the one you go with that solves it, accept that one. (If any go untried, well, luck of the draw.) If your findings are that an answer gets 90% there, but you need to do something extra to make it fully work at ...


13

We can't actually edit that part of the tour just for this site, so this is a Stack Exchange dev thing. But, also, no. The tour shouldn't be updated to say that. This isn't necessarily a “generally accepted best practice” to wait a while before accepting an answer — it's something some vocal people think should happen. Not everyone agrees that should happen ...


13

It was specifically awarded that way. I placed and awarded the bounty. I am going to preface this by saying I am not interested at all in debating any points about your (or any) answer, and am tempted to answer here simply by saying "because bounties may be awarded at the offerer's discretion with any or no justification" to avoid a round of "but but my ...


12

What they are doing is well within the scope set out by the guidelines / rules. Check out the tour if you haven't already and nip down to the section on answering: Accepting doesn't mean it's the best answer, it just means that it worked for the person who asked. You can also see this on the page specifically about accepting answers: It simply means that ...


12

The only way to move a checkmark is by the question-asker doing it. Not even mods can override which answer the asker found most useful. There's no expectation set by SE that the checkmark will correspond to the best answer anyway. The opposite is actually considered fine (emphasis mine): Accepting an answer is not meant to be a definitive and final ...


11

Yes, as long as your question allowed for homebrew. This is the intended behavior of the system.


10

It is the answer the OP considers the best, that helps them the most with their problem. That does not mean it is the objectively best one. Feel free and vote for the answer(s) you like. However, the accepted answer is at the OP’s sole discretion and it can’t be “appealed.” We get flags with people saying “they accepted answer X but I think it’s wrong!” ...


10

The guiding principles for good edits are “Does it improve the post?” and “Does it preserve the intended meaning?” Changing the original author's intended meaning, or not improving a post, are the main reasons that an edit gets rejected or undone. By that measure most of those are fine edits to do, as they need not change the meaning of the post, only its ...


10

It was up to the Bounty creator If they didn't choose an answer, then it defaults to the highest voted. If they did, then that was their choice. There are times when selected bounties and answers are just what the bounty creator(or asker in some cases) wanted to read - but we have to trust that others looking can see beyond those cases. We don't ask people ...


8

Awarding a bounty of the “reward existing answer” variety to another answer you like is a fine idea. You should be able to do so without fiddling the accept checkmark — I don’t believe starting a bounty is affected by the checkmark. (It only affects awarding, and only if you forget to award it before it expires.) You can award a bounty the day after you ...


8

This is a tricky situation. By all accounts, the first version of the answer - which was accepted - had some pretty incorrect statements in it. (This is why you don't accept answers within a day, people!) It should have, accordingly, been downvoted. Andras's edit was definitely an improvement. But it was also an edit that was too major, outright replacing ...


7

You have several options: Accept an answer you like more than the others. This is particularly useful if you're asking a question about a situation in your game, and you choose one answer among them to be the ruling/idea you use in your game. Accept an answer, and bounty one or several of the other answers. You can always add bounties to questions you or ...


7

Yes Giving feedback for what you found useful is a generally good idea. This includes when multiple good answers appear on the same question. However This site doesn't provide good ways to do that beyond accepting an answer. nitsua60 mentions in another comment that as a Mod, they wouldn't immediately delete comments used for such, but also supports the ...


7

Yes, you should ignore it. On this stack in particular, since it is about a gaming hobby and not about a medical question or computer codes that might end up in a public train, accepting that whomever asks the question likes a particular answer better than other answers is just fine. The votes will tell the rest of the story. And that's fine too, the ...


7

Everything doppelgreener says in their answer is perfectly correct. Those are all good solutions. Here's one more: Don't accept any. If you feel like accepting one of the four would lend too much weight to that one over the other three, just don't do it. In that case, given that you've indicated four that you'd all give a check-mark to if you could, I ...


7

If a question generates two highly upvoted answers, that themselves are mutually exclusive with each other (i.e. "yes, this is possible" vs "no, this is not possible"), then the safest conclusion you can draw is to assert that the decision really boils down to DM decision making. D&D, especially 5e (the system you posted that question for) relies ...


6

Yes. Encouraging users to wait 24 hours before accepting an answer is good. It is not policy At least it's not anywhere that is easy to find nor readily apparent when posting a question. It is a good informal recommendation Allows time for answers from other time zones as people are active at different times in the day. Allows time for better researched ...


5

It depends on the Question and on the Answer I don't think this would be good as a hard and fast rule but I think it might be good as a recommendation on certain types of questions. The best way I can break that down is "hard" questions/answers and "soft" questions/answers. And attempting to give examples: We had a question recently that was "Does an ...


5

We can't do anything about it From mxyzplk's comment from GreySage's answer: We can’t [modify the hover text], as we can’t edit any other automated text on the site except one small part of the help center. And from doppelgreener's answer to a different question about the tour: We can't actually edit that part of the tour just for this site, so this is a ...


5

The correct answer should be the one which solved your problem. So I would recommend to wait with accepting until you tried the proposed methods in the real world. Then accept the answer which proposed the method which was most successful. When that method was mentioned by multiple answers, then it's basically about which of them you considered the best ...


5

Reward one (or both) of the answers with a bounty When you choose to start a bounty you can select: Reward an existing answer You can reward 50 - 400 of your own rep to another user with an exceptional answer. You can even give a bounty to both answers, but be careful because the second bounty must be twice the amount of the first bounty.


4

I would say that asking the editor to post his own answer and rolling the already accepted answer back to its accepted state would be best. The asker accepted the answer for a reason. If the answer had not been accepted I would say that in this specific case the answer was edited to such a high degree that a roll back would also be appropriate, that amount ...


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