Hot answers tagged

43

Yes, these questions are fine. No, actually, they are more than fine—they are literally exactly the sort of thing that makes RPG SE have value. We are supposed to be a community of experts who can tackle difficult questions with strong, authoritative answers that are backed up by considerable experience working on these sorts of questions. It’s totally ...


24

Yes, "we" should stop repeating that phrase Why? In part because it comes off as passive-aggressive The "and nothing more" piece is the particular problem in that regard. That's an unhelpful coda to the original points that were offered up by the game's developers as summarized in this Q&A. Succinctly put... if a feature was meant ...


18

We use the Rules As Written because we must When people say "Spells do only what they say they do and nothing more" or some similar phrase, they use it for a number of reasons. Though I'll drop the following links as you may find them helpful: What is the source of the "spells do only what they say they do" rules interpretation principle?...


12

Yes, we should, and often do Often being somewhat loosely defined. There are a few trends I've observed which tend to promote the unfortunate recitations of "rules do what they say and nothing more". 1. The stack is currently in a phase which favors ease and consistency of site curation Both in terms of community (votes by users, and discussions on ...


11

We need a great deal more acknowledgment of that fact the it isn’t entirely true D&D 5e dominates our questions these days—as the most recent and popular edition of the most famous and popular role-playing game, this is no great surprise. One of the more common formulations of this sentiment—“there are no hidden rules”—comes from Jeremy Crawford, a lead ...


11

I will echo my answer here. It’s about tweets, but it applies to interviews. Readers decide if answers provide valuable information. Our goal is to help querents and future readers find solutions to their problems, and each person writing an answer is going to do that differently. When you write an answer, you decide what you think is the information ...


6

Your question was originally closed for “needs more focus”, and each of these steps are concrete ways you can focus your question on the actual problem you are trying to solve. Step 0: Interact with comments. Usually, close voters will leave a comment explaining why the question was closed. Your question is no exception. All of the steps I am about to offer ...


6

(Non-D&D answer since this question is no longer D&D5-tagged.) I think we've hit a point where different game systems have different standards and your answer should reflect that. E.g., Modern D&D has a lot of rules, written by multiple authors, which accumulate over time. There are official channels for rules updates and clarifications, which ...


3

It should be reopened. As you say, one is a question about a feat, and the other is a question about a class feature. These are two clearly distinct rules items, even if the wording is similar (or even identical), and as such, the two questions are distinct rather than duplicates. As such, the question should be reopened, simply because of that difference ...


2

One of the best ways is to do some research first This article for D&D 5e class modification is almost five years old. It provides a conceptual framework around 'what each class is intended to be' and a few mechanical notes on class features. It also provides two complete examples of how to modify an existing class. And yet I see, time and again, ...


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