37

Authors bring insight that is often highly valued by us—but that doesn't obviate our voting system and automatically make their answers "right". Unless people overwhelmingly vote for the author's answer, of course. In short, we carry on as we are, and the votes will tell.


29

I don’t really expect it to become a huge issue. We don’t get that many answers along these lines. That said, an author brings obvious authority to any rules discussion. That said, what the author intended is not necessarily the best way to run a rule (sometimes unintended side-effects are actually more fun) nor is it necessarily what actually ...


28

We've definitely had TRPG creators participating in the site, including a co-creator of Lovecraftesque and Fred Hicks. I've been told we used to have some WotC contributors participating here, but most of them were not publicly associating their SE accounts with their professional names. And since claims to being a games creator on this site aren't ...


22

There's no firmly established way to handle a game's own designer, mainly because it's so uncommon such a person shows up here to answer questions about their game. We treat game designers like regular users, but slightly more lenient. We're more patient with introducing and explaining things to them because naturally we'd like them to stick around — ...


22

There's not a way we have to validate such claims and note them in a persistent way - and we're not really interested in doing so. Answers' value should be taken in and of themselves; and as a user builds up a reputation, that can also help inform people of the likely value of their answers. We've had people on the site who said they were everyone from ...


19

At the moment, I don't think this is really controversial to say: Answers require supporting evidence here, and "I'm a developer for this game" is not in some way protected from that burden of proof. And honestly, its in the best interest of the real Clint Black that we enforce proof on this point, as the potential for highly damaging situations is too ...


17

I’ve worked for Dreamscarred Press, and my name’s on the cover of at least one book they published. Various other members of DSP have also been active here, including its founders. Dunno if DSP still counts as a “major” third-party publisher, but there was a point in time when they were often regarded as “the one exception” by people who disliked third-party ...


17

This is the Internet: assume no one is who they say they are. I'm certainly not me. Nevertheless, this site is a meritocracy based on the quality of the answers. Good answers can incorporate an appeal to authority but that authority has to be authoritative, however, this is not the only measure of a good answer. If a poster has a position of responsibility ...


15

In this case, the post notice was applied before he identified himself as a designer. "I'm a designer for that game" is a valid source citation, and now that he's added it the post notice has been removed. It's really as simple as that... Prior to that, his simple "Only one!" answer was treated as a low quality answer by the community like any other would ...


14

Raddu is Robert Adducci, one-time DDAL Community Manager (his profile is a bit out of date). His name first appeared as part of the admin team the "inside cover" of a DDAL module with DDEX01-01 and last appeared on DDAL07-08, plus some credits as primary author mixed in there, too. He's also credited in Lost Laboratory of Kwalish and probably other things I ...


14

ExTSR was Frank Mentzer (who was the key / lead developer of BECMI D&D). Both he and mxyzplk were pretty abrasive and neither was very good at tolerating the other's playstyle's presence on the site, which eventually lead to Mentzer's ragequitting the site: though the account hasn't been deleted it was last used in March 2014. Before that he was very ...


11

That looks like it’s trying to solve the same problem to me, making it a duplicate. “Is X true about Y?” has a problem to solve: what is the rule about X and Y. Asking a second question about whether a designer had said so is trying to solve the same problem: what is the rule about X and Y. Generally, a question that amounts to “Is the answer to that ...


10

Close it As you said, it is just too similar to designer-reasons: It is not a problem to solve. The actual problem (if class features are optional or not) doesn't need designer's quote for an answer. It is hard to prove a negative, especially when the answer saying "He didn't say it because the rules are not like that" is not accepted by the asker....


8

Don't ask unrelated or "follow-up" questions in comments, that's not cool. Feel free to ask a bajillion follow-up or unrelated questions as questions, though, that's totally fine. It's unlikely, however, you will get Word of God answers to all of them.


8

This is effectively asked and answered already in Is there an established way to handle a game's designer on the site? and To what extent does a well known representative from an RPG company who represents their product need to provide evidence of this in their answers? No, we don't ask for "proof", because the proof doesn't make them automatically right ...


7

We should ask for links to verifiable 3rd-party websites. Anyone can claim to be a relevant notable figure; StackExchange has no method of verifying these users, the way Twitter does. Because we can't verify such claims, they are essentially hearsay, i.e. opinion. That said, notable figures can still provide answers. If you really are That One Guy, then you ...


6

The author isn't necessarily the best person to know about character optimization in the game they designed, as they didn't necessarily write it with that in mind. Balancing is often done via playtesting rather than mathematical models. In those cases, someone that actually spends their time doing optimization is probably the better source of an answer. ...


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