23

No question is too old to answer, and there's no stigma against giving a good answer even if it's to your own question! As counter-intuitive as it may seem, the Stack Exchange isn't really about giving answers to the people who ask questions; its primary goal is to collect good answers to the future users who have the same question. This means questions ...


22

Self Answers to questions are good Across Stack Exchange, there's always been a stigma against self-answered questions due to the perception that this is intended to function as a kind of Reputation Farming. I don't agree with that perception, both from a theoretical perspective, and from the practical perspective of observing that Self-Answered questions ...


20

This sounds like an ideal case for accepting your own answer. Go ahead. To answer your questions: Is there a way to pass the right to accept answers to another user or a group of users? There is not. You retain sole agency over the accepted answer. Not even diamond moderators can change or set an accepted answer on your behalf. Generally speaking, is ...


20

Yes, you may do that. This is in fact exactly the kind of scenario for which self-answered questions exist: describe a problem you've experienced and ask how to resolve it, then provide the solution you used. Thank you for thinking to share what you've learned with others, I appreciate it. If you have financial/business ties with the game, please remember ...


18

Absolutely! There hasn't been a change in policy and we still do it (some of us more than others:) )


18

You cannot control what other people do, just what you do. Post your answer. If the OP or anyone else doesn't like it - that's their right, even if they're being a dink. If they post a comment that you think helps refine your answer, edit to take it into account; otherwise don't reply. It takes two to argue in comments. Don't enable it. What "should" ...


16

This is a good example of something that should be a self answered question. If you have a question, especially a relatively obscure one, then it's a great idea to go ahead and ask it, and then answer it yourself if you've found the answer already. This increases the knowledge base of this site, and helps other folks find the answer easily if they've got ...


15

No, in fact it's encouraged. The important things to note when you give your answer: Attribution is required. All content on SE is licensed as CC-By-SA and as such the author must be attributed, so if you reuse parts of the other answers, you're required to give them credit for it (plus its the neighborly thing to do). Make sure you put some effort into ...


13

If what you did was mostly different from the other answers and solved your problem, post your own answer and accept it. There's a waiting period for self-accepting, but other than that it's fair game. The goal is to get the best answer to have the green checkmark next to it. If what you did was mostly the same as an existing answer with a few tweaks, ...


13

Can and should. The stack welcomes this kind of FAQ behaviour by design. Stack Exchange is a network of sites with one goal in mind: To build a knowledge base on each particular subject. Can I answer my own question? Yes! Stack Exchange has always explicitly encouraged users to answer their own questions. (...) And from Jeff Atwood himself: It’s ...


11

Yes, sorta. I agree with V2 that the way you pose it in your post here--"what's a good example of combat"--would be broad and unclear. However, it sounds like you've experienced difficulty sorting out combat in D:tD. Or you've helped others sort out that sort of difficulty. So leverage that experience: think of a scenario or combination of elements that ...


11

Absolutely, in fact its encouraged and I believe there is even a badge you can earn for doing it.


9

It looks like EngineerToast has now posted their own answer based on their comment (after some encouragement and help from the community), so you might consider choosing that for your accepted answer if it meets your criteria and solves your issue. If not... Post your own answer Answering your own question is not only acceptable, but it is actually ...


6

This is not only okay, but explicitly encouraged: if you have a question that you already know the answer to if you’d like to document it in public so others (including yourself) can find it later it is OK to ask, and answer, your own question on a relevant Stack Exchange site. To be crystal clear, it is not merely OK to ask and answer your ...


4

I agree with WaxEagle's answer. I'd like to add another example of when it would be appropriate, as I see it. Since I wasn't certain of the way to rule that, I posed the question (which can stand alone) and gave my answer to it. Note that Starwed's answer is accepted and not mine; Despite the fact that I've been playing it in my own ruling for a while, their ...


3

In the words of Mick Jones of Big Audio Dynamite, "Break it on down — bless you." It's so much easier to address these kinds of things when you've got discrete questions at the decision points than in one long work. Your answerers will thank you.


2

Edit an update onto the end of your question to let viewers know how it went In cases like these I think it's acceptable to add edit an addendum onto your original question that describes which approach you used and how it went, if it's based on suggestions you received as answers rather than an independent solution you could post as an answer itself. ...


2

It'd likely be too broad, as currently worded I'm not familiar with the CoD combat system in particular. However, a question asking generically "How does combat work?" seems too broad, as there can be many different aspects to combat. (Compare this to, say, a question about how a particular spell, magic item, or class feature works in one system.) I think ...


2

You can if you want to, but don't have to. Self-answered questions are encouraged on the site. What you shouldn't do is have arguments in comments about the answers you disagree with. Post your own answer instead.


2

No Just because an answer is trivial to verify does not mean that a question is trivial to answer. If someone asked "How do you grapple in D&D 3.5?" and you answered with a homebrew grappling system intended for GURPS, I can (and should) downvote your answer and/or leave a comment explaining how and that your answer is completely off base and possibly ...


2

It strikes me as appropriate when you actually decide on a course of action. Certainly with the "best answer" button it identifies the closest answer to your desired solution, but it never hurts to put a synopsis of how the other responses led you to a course of action as well.


1

Encourage your players to post their questions. We will then go through the usual clarification process to figure out what exactly their question is. You are then welcome to answer their revised question with your house rule (if it still makes sense) with discussion of how your house rule changed play at the table.


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